New rules could help with runoff in Sammamish

July 29, 2014

July 29, 10:43 a.m.

A change in stormwater rules will make more new homes subject to a review process that could reduce the impact new homes have on existing neighbors.
The Sammamish City Council enacted the regulations July 15 with a unanimous vote. Read more

3 vie for District Court judgeship

July 28, 2014

A trio of part-time judges is competing to fill an open seat on King County District Court. Judge Linda Jacke has announced her retirement in the Northeast Division, which serves a large swath of the eastside stretching from Lake Washington in the west to the county line in the east, and from Newcastle and areas south of North Bend in the south to the county line in the north. The district also includes the part of Bothell in Snohomish County.
Jacke’s courtroom is in Redmond, though there’s no guarantee the new judge would sit there. Read more

Pine Lake Garden Club hosting annual tour

July 25, 2014

The Pine Lake Garden Club will be hosting its annual garden tour Aug. 9 at six area homes. Read more

Lawyer-turned-author Gullette finding joy in sci-fi series

July 20, 2014

New: July 20, 2:51 p.m.

Rob Gullette has the same pursuits as many of his fellow retirees: He enjoys playing golf, visiting with his grandchildren and spending the winter months in a warmer climate.
But Gullette, 67, who has lived in Sammamish since 1988, also keeps busy in nontraditional fashion. He’s the author of the “Apollo Evolutions” series, which debuted in 2012 with the publication of “Waking Apollo,” and continues with its sequel, “Lyra’s Silence,” later this year.

Rob Gullette

Rob Gullette

Read more

Quidditch makes young ‘Potter’ fans dance at library

July 19, 2014

New: July 19, 11:18 a.m.

Sara Jensen’s job is to get children interested in reading, and she found an effective book series to accomplish that task.
Dozens of children have been coming to the Sammamish Library since January, when Jensen, a children’s services librarian, began leading a book club on the “Harry Potter” saga.
About 30 boys and girls, most between the ages of 10-13, attended the book club’s June 19 meeting. They were there to talk about the sixth book, “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” but a guest leading a special activity might have been the real reason behind the attendance surge on the first day of summer vacation for Lake Washington and Issaquah district students.

Chris Nguyen, center, an 11-year-old student at Blackwell Elementary School, tries to pass the quaffle to a teammate during a friendly game of quidditch at the Sammamish Library on June 19. Students have been meeting in a monthly book club since January to discuss the ‘Harry Potter’ book series and participate in book-related activities like quidditch. Photo by Neil Pierson

Chris Nguyen, center, an 11-year-old student at Blackwell Elementary School, tries to pass the quaffle to a teammate during a friendly game of quidditch at the Sammamish Library on June 19. Students have been meeting in a monthly book club since January to discuss the ‘Harry Potter’ book series and participate in book-related activities like quidditch. Photo by Neil Pierson

Read more

King County has world’s highest survival rate for cardiac arrest

July 18, 2014

New: July 18, 3:17 p.m.
Someone who has a cardiac arrest in King County has a greater chance of survival than anyone else in the world, according the latest analysis by county officials.
The survival rate for cardiac arrest in King County hit an all-time high of 62 percent in 2013. By comparison, the cardiac survival rates in New York City, Chicago and other urban areas have been recorded in the single digits.
“People are alive today in King County who would not have survived in most other places in the country,” King County Executive Dow Constantine said in a news release. “Our system delivers rapid, high-quality critical care wherever you are.”
King County’s success in saving lives is based in a coordinated, regional system where everyone — dispatchers, first responders, fire departments, law enforcement, paramedics, urgent care centers and others — is guided by consistent medical direction and evidence-based practice.
The cardiac survival rate in King County has dramatically risen over the past decade or so, from an above-average 27 percent in 2002 to 62 percent in 2013. Strategies that have contributed to the rise include:

  • Adoption of high-performance CPR method by emergency medical technicians to maximize oxygen circulation and increase survival chances.
  • Adoption of telecommunicator CPR, whereby 911 emergency personnel provide instant CPR instructions by phone.
  • Increasing public availability of automated external defibrillators, including more than 100 in King County facilities, and placement of them in many law enforcement vehicles, including with King County sheriff’s deputies.
  • High rates of CPR training for local residents.
  • A regional paramedic training program, funded by charitable contributions, that exceeds national standards for certification.

Officials also point to the success of the county’s EMS/Medic One System. Introduced in Seattle in 1970, the Medic One program was one of the first in the nation to provide paramedic services; the program spread to all of King County in 1973. The EMS/Medic One program has become a model nationwide for delivery of lifesaving first-responder services.
Learn more at www.kingcounty.gov/health/ems.

Kokanee salmon recovering, not yet safe

July 17, 2014

New: July 17, 1:24 p.m.

Local groups have been working to save the Lake Sammamish kokanee salmon, and while the news over the past few years isn’t tremendously better, it is less bad.
“We’re doing better, but it’s still verging on extinction,” said David St. John of the King County Department of Natural Resources during the July 8 City Council meeting. Read more

Big Rock Park plan approved

July 16, 2014

New: July 16, 1:19 p.m.

Big Rock Park might be getting some elevated walkways, but that will likely be for another City Council to decide.
The council unanimously approved a master plan for the park July 8. Most of the park’s amenities were uncontroversial, and went through without any discussion. However, councilmembers voted on four specific parts of the park plan individually. Mayor Tom Vance conducted the votes in a way that limited opportunities for councilmembers to make amendments (see sidebar), though some did happen. Read more

New state stormwater regulations could make Town Center harder to build

July 15, 2014

New: July 15, 3:04 p.m.

A series of new stormwater regulations look like they might make it harder for developers interested in building in the town center area.
The rules place much tighter requirements on the amount of water that a new building can generate and let flow into a wetland.
Eric LaFrance, the city’s stormwater engineer, gave the City Council an overview of the new rules July 7. Read more

Weeklong traffic snarl starts Friday on I-90

July 14, 2014

New: July 14, 1:58 p.m.

Drivers heading to Mercer Island or Seattle along I-90 should ready themselves for significant delays due to a large construction project that begins July 18. Westbound I-90 will be reduced to one lane for seven straight days as the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) replaces the expansion joints on the East Channel Bridge, which links Mercer Island to Bellevue. Read more

Next Page »